Removing the Transmission, Act 2

11/29, 59/46, NW5-10 - Today’s goal was to extract the transmission and pack it for shipping. The air was too chilly to get started right away, so I walked up to the bathroom and took a shower. The shower is nice, with a small teak-topped bench, lots of hooks and shelves, and an abundant supply of hot water. There’s even a small hair dryer. I came back to Grace and worked on our travelogue until 10am. Dobbs reinstalled the modified thermostat (he drilled two more holes in it) and texted with Brad about the oil leak at the pulley on the front of the engine. Brad recommends we monitor it, but says we don’t need to take action unless we see a puddle of oil forming.

 Additional holes now drilled in the thermostat is 3, plus the two that come already in it, for a total of 5. Dobbs adds holes to increase water flow through the system - the engine still comes up to a respectable temperature, but we pump more water (and less steam) out the back.

Additional holes now drilled in the thermostat is 3, plus the two that come already in it, for a total of 5. Dobbs adds holes to increase water flow through the system - the engine still comes up to a respectable temperature, but we pump more water (and less steam) out the back.

At 10am, we continued with disassembling the engine to remove the transmission. First, Dobbs removed the starter, which blocks some of the bell housing bolts.

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Then, working together, we removed all of the bell housing bolts.

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The block of wood was in place under the oil pan to support the rear of the engine, and we had a line tied from the cockpit to the transmission, to keep it from dropping in the bilge once free.

 Note that when we use the boom as a crane, we attach the main halyard opposite the lifting tackle. This way, the boom doesn’t bow under the load.

Note that when we use the boom as a crane, we attach the main halyard opposite the lifting tackle. This way, the boom doesn’t bow under the load.

We wanted to rotate the bell housing open-end up in the well so that the bolts that hold the transmission could be removed. The space is so tight that we ended up needing to unbolt the forward engine mounts and slide the engine forward an inch or two on the beds in order to pull it off.

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I carefully packed the transmission and Dobbs started reassembling the essential parts. The bell housing had to go back on since it has the two rear engine mounts. Some of the lag bolts had to go back in the mounts to secure them to the beds. The starter needed to be re-connected so that we could turn power back on. All told, it took about 5-1/2 hours plus about an hour and a half yesterday.

At 4pm it was warm enough outside to sit in the cockpit and drink a beer. Then Dobbs walked Murphy while I put the starboard quarterberth back together and stowed our tools. That’s a nice project (removing the transmission) to be done with for two weeks. For dinner, I browned butternut squash and onions in butter and threw in a ham slice. I served peas (cooked from dried) alongside. I tend to work more with dried beans than canned, since I’m often walking home from the grocery store and I consider weight-to-servings; also, the storage volume is smaller with dried. Dobbs just finished the dishes, but it’s still too early to go to bed. Perhaps a dog walk or some coloring is in order…