Tensioning CDI Furlers

1/17 Thursday, 70/48, sunny, N5 - Boy, I felt rough with a head cold last night. I’m getting better, but my nose is running nonstop. Benadryl helps but also makes my sinuses painfully dry. Another day or two and I should be fine. I slept until 6:45am because I felt sick and sore.

The weather has been chilly enough recently and into the future forecast that I decided to root back out some of my cold weather clothing. Shorts and tank taps seem pretty optimistic and I’d rather have my wool socks and flannels right now.

I decided to empty and recharge our composting head. We haven’t been using it here at the dock, but it also doesn’t dry out very quickly when temperatures average 65-70 degrees.

Our neighbors from New Hampshire continued on their way. After lunch, Dobbs did some rigging work - tensioning the sail luffs of two CDI behind-the-mast furling units on a Pearson 365. All CDI’s obtain luff tension without the use of a winch; instead they have a simple downhaul arrangement which is described in the manual: “1. Attach the halyard to the head of the sail. 2. Pull up the sail by pulling down on the messenger line attached to the decored end of the halyard while feeding the luff tape into the sail feed slot. 3. When the sail is fully hoisted, remove the messenger line and make the decored end of the halyard fast to the halyard anchor shackle. 4. Tension the luff of the sail with the tack tension line, passing two or three parts through the downhaul shackle on the reefing drum and grommet on the sail. Finish off with some half hitches.” Unfortunately, every photo of the system on the CDI website, including photos in the manuals, shows this set up incorrectly, with no luff tension. Garrrgh!

I finished all the client communications waiting on my list and brought our travelogue up to date, interspersed with filling the water tank and brushing Murphy. At 3:30pm, Murphy and I walked over to A-dock where Dobbs was working, to meet the folks and see the boats over there.

The view from A-dock.

The view from A-dock.

Dobbs had finished with his project, so he joined me and Murphy on a walk around Sand Point Park.

The reptilian look of the leaves of this succulent caught my attention.

The reptilian look of the leaves of this succulent caught my attention.

Then we came home and had gin-and-tonics and snack in the cockpit. Dock hand Michael paid us a visit and learned about sheets, headsails (genoa versus jib), tacking, hull speed, and what the inside of a vintage 31’ sailboat is like. Later, for dinner I made cheeseburgers and potato fries. Now it’s 8:25pm, Les Brown is playing “I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm”, and there are clean dishes (thank you, Dobbs) to be dried. I’m grateful to my late Dad for my love of both big band and classical music.