A New Week of Opportunities

12/10, 45/36, cloudy, NW10-15>20 - A new week of unknown opportunities. The morning passed in writing and ordering parts for a Spring project - replacing storm-damaged rub rail on a 1998 Beneteau 321.

The boat found the finger pier in a strong blow. The bottom edge of the toe rail, quite streamlined, managed to hang up on the edge of the dock boards. As the tide went out, the weight of the boat bent the aluminum back on itself. We’ll be replacing the section from the starboard stern quarter to a point amidships - somewhere a joint can be concealed.

The boat found the finger pier in a strong blow. The bottom edge of the toe rail, quite streamlined, managed to hang up on the edge of the dock boards. As the tide went out, the weight of the boat bent the aluminum back on itself. We’ll be replacing the section from the starboard stern quarter to a point amidships - somewhere a joint can be concealed.

We started preparing our holiday letter to close friends and family. As I write it, looking back through my calendar, I’m reminded of the fun, enriching experiences we’ve had. I select photos to go with the narrative and move them into a folder (digitally). Dobbs assembles everything into a festive greeting, complete with holiday art. I think about our families and friends and how those relationships have contributed to my life, and how precious they are, even at a distance. Digital art not being my forte, however, by 2:30pm I was fidgeting in my seat. Murphy was ready to stretch his legs, too.

Dobbs guided us on a two-hour walk through the community. It’s a treat to see garden flowers in bloom in December and bluebirds flying tree to tree. Our path took us past Seabrook Farm, a community garden where residents maintain individual plots of vegetables, herbs, and flowers. We even saw some oranges and lemons.

Curious about a nearby small farm with horses labeled “Marsh Tacky”, tonight I learned online about this rare and special breed of the Sea Islands of South Carolina.

The evening’s meal was hot dogs and sauerkraut. I made and canned the sauerkraut in late September/early October. I’d never made it before this year and I recommend, if you like eating it, try making it! It’s so easy - just shredded cabbage, salt, and time. As it ages over a 1-2 week period, I taste it every day or so until it reaches the amount of tanginess I prefer. At first, the taste of raw cabbage is foremost. Ambient air temperature affects how long it takes to ferment. At some point, that characteristic mouth-watering sourness begins to develop and the cole crop bitterness fades away. The texture is subtly crunchy and juicy, the flavor rich and tangy. Beyond being better than store-bought, another benefit of making sauerkraut is that, if you’re faced with a surplus of cabbage, it compacts a head or two into two quart jars. Homemade sauerkraut will keep for weeks in the refrigerator, or you can take the extra step, as I did, of canning it in a boiling water bath.

Suzanne FrybergerComment